12
July
Beginnings Unveiled
16 :10 PM / whole / 0 Comments

I have been quite quiet on the blogging front here but there is a very sufficient reason/s.

I have been busy creating. Beginnings Unveiled (4)

The choice was made in February this year to really step up into my creative artistic self. So with the personal challenge set and accepted I have made changes to create some more.

One of those things was to honour myself and invest in me by committing to a Soul Healing session each week. During one of those sessions I had a vision and knew immediately that it was going to be painted onto a canvas. Shortly thereafter an opportunity arose to enter the art piece into an exhibition whose theme ‘Mythology’ fit perfectly with what I had arise in my vision.

Follow this link to see this piece displayed on the wall of Aspire Gallery in Paddington, Brisbane.
What’s more…..as I write this I am informed that I am today’s featured artist @aspiregallery.

It was a very new thing for me to do and I am so happy that I did. Though while it was being hung and the exhibition readied for the opening day on Saturday I had been away on a Deep Immersion Artist Retreat.

Wow! Wow! And more wow for how much I have witnessed myself grow and in an acknowledgment of this growth I also made a few more commitments to which I won’t yet reveal all.

I had a few silent commitments that I am voicing now. I am committing to eating vegetarian again and omitting caffeine and feeling further into this feeling, it strongly extends to the omission of alcohol.

Upon sharing the vegetarian commitment with my husband, he responded with a resounding yes vibration of love and support and is happily on board with me which is so fantastic and makes keeping to this commitment that much easier.

He told me he discovered an app that would be helpful and so far is very helpful.

It’s called Dr.Greger’s Daily Dozen and I’m loving it.

I have so much to share and to do creatively that I feel that full that I shall almost combust.

Life is such a miracle and a blessing.

I am just going to go into what the vision meaning and canvas creation is to me.

My (the artist)’s interpretation of this piece is a representation of life itself as represented all throughout the past to the present moment.

The rabbit/hare – The belief of animism is integral to tribal belief, animism is the understanding that all things in nature possess a spirit and presence of their own, so that rocks trees and the land were things to be learned from – as well as the ancestral spirits, who acted as guides for the future well-being of the tribe (although some beliefs about time were radically different to our own understanding).

Considering a rabbit’s foot lucky is actually an ancient tradition in much of the world. At least as far back as the 7th century BCE, the rabbit was a talismanic symbol in Africa, and in Celtic Europe, rabbits were considered lucky as well. Thus keeping a part of the rabbit was considered good fortune, and a rabbit’s foot was a handy means by which to benefit from the luck of the rabbit.

These traditions were not marred much by the onset of other more prominent religions like Christianity. Even in the strongly Catholic Ireland of the Middle Ages, there were still superstitious beliefs regarding fairies or the Tuatha De Danaan who resided underground. Gradually, as Christianity spread in Ireland, the old Gods of Celtic belief became associated with hell. Rabbits were thought to have special protective powers needed for residing underground. Thus the rabbit’s foot could be protection from evil spirits, and is even considered so today.

Other ancient groups imbued the rabbit’s foot with specific forms of luck. To the Chinese, a rabbit’s foot may be a symbol of prosperity. Also the known proclivity for rabbits to reproduce quickly and breed often has been noted in numerous cultures past and present. The rabbit’s foot can be carried by women who wish to get pregnant, or who wish to enhance their sexual lives. Sexuality in general is also related to the wish for abundance, fertile crops, and good weather.

Some traditions of how to collect a rabbit’s foot state that they’re only lucky when taken from cross-eyed rabbits living in graveyards. On the night of a full moon, you must shoot the rabbit with a silver bullet. Further, only the left hind foot is lucky in many traditions. If you can manage all that you don’t need a rabbit’s foot. You must be the luckiest person around.

Hares feature in Irish folklore, and the hare is older than our island’s culture itself. The Irish hare has been immortalised as the animal gracing the Irish pre-decimal three pence piece. Hare mythology exists throughout almost every ancient culture and when the first settlers colonised Ireland, the Irish hare was already an iconic figure. There are many examples in Celtic mythology, and storytellers still relate tales of women who can shape-change into hares. The cry of the Banshee foretelling death might be legend but it may have parallels with the Irish hare of today as it struggles to avoid extinction in modern times.

For ancient communities that had struggled to survive the winter with limited food reserves, eggs were often the first of nature’s bounty to save them from starvation. No wonder then that the hare was revered as a symbol of life and endowed with magical powers.

The Celts believed that the goddess Eostre’s favourite animal and attendant spirit was the hare. It represented love, fertility and growth and was associated with the Moon, dawn and Easter, death, redemption and resurrection. Eostre changed into a hare at the full Moon. The hare was sacred to the White Goddess, the Earth Mother, and as such was considered to be a royal animal. Boudicca was said to have released a hare as a good omen before each battle and to divine the outcome of battle by the hare’s movements. She took a hare into battle with her to ensure victory and it was said to have screamed like a woman from beneath her cloak.

In Europe there are wide-spread remnants of a cult of a hare goddess and man has for centuries feared the hare because of the supernatural powers with which he has endowed her solitude, her remoteness and her subtle, natural skills. Active at night, symbolic of the intuitive, and the fickleness of the moon, the hare is an emblem of inconstancy. Like the moon which is always changing places in the sky, hares have illogical habits and are full of mystery and contradictions. Certainly it has never been regarded as an ordinary creature in any part of the world, and in ancient Egypt the hare was used as a Hieroglyph for the word denoting existence

Many divergent cultures link the hare with the moon and Buddhists have a saying about the “shadow of the hare in the moon” instead of the man in the moon. They see the hare as a resurrection symbol. The moon is perhaps the most manifest symbol of this universal becoming, birth, growth, reproduction, death and rebirth. The moon disappears, dies and is born again, and this underlies most primitive initiation rites, that a being must die before he can be born again on a higher spiritual level.

The symbol of the hare was used deliberately to transfer old pagan religion into a Christian context, and the Albrecht Durer woodcut of the Holy Family (1471-1 528) clearly depicts three hares at the family’s feet. Later superstition changed the Easter hare into the Easter rabbit or bunny, far less threatening than the ancient pagan symbol and very few people will be aware that the hare ever held such standing.

As the ancient beliefs died, superstitions about the hare were rife and many witches were reported to have hares as their familiars.

Today we talk of a lucky rabbit’s foot but for many generations a hare’s paw or foot was used as a charm against evil, a throw-back to the long forgotten belief in Eostre the Celtic dawn goddess.

When you next see hares boxing in the fields, remember that they are not simply soft cute animals. They carry millennia of mythology, folklore and tradition with them. Mankind’s reverence has helped them to shape the rituals and traditions that we still celebrate across the world.

The moon         –
Since ancient times, full moons have been associated with odd or insane behavior, including sleepwalking, suicide, illegal activity, fits of violence and, of course, transforming into werewolves. Indeed, the words “lunacy” and “lunatic” come from the Roman goddess of the moon, Luna, who was said to ride her silver chariot across the dark sky each night. For thousands of years, doctors and mental health professionals believed in a strong connection between mania and the moon. Hippocrates, considered the father of modern medicine, wrote in the fifth century B.C. that “one who is seized with terror, fright and madness during the night is being visited by the goddess of the moon.” In 18th-century England, people on trial for murder could campaign for a lighter sentence on grounds of lunacy if the crime occurred under a full moon; meanwhile, psychiatric patients at London’s Bethlehem Hospital were shackled and flogged as a preventive measure during certain lunar phases. Even today, despite studies discrediting the hypothesis, some people think full moons make everyone a little loony.
Perhaps because the menstrual and lunar cycles are similar in length, many early civilizations believed that the moon determined when women could become pregnant. This could explain why female moon deities—from the Chinese goddess Chang’e to Mama Quilla of the Incas—figure so prominently in mythologies from around the world. In the 1950s, the Czech doctor Eugene Jonas stumbled across an ancient Assyrian astrological text stating that women are fertile during certain phases of the moon. He based an entire family planning method on this hypothesis, telling his patients they ovulated when the moon was in the same position as when they were born. According to another theory that persists to this day, full moons cause an uptick in births, flooding maternity wards with mothers-to-be in labor. Recent studies have turned up little statistical evidence for moon-induced baby booms, however, and most experts think any lunar effect on procreation is imagined.
A rabbit dwells on the moon.
Intriguingly, legends from various traditions around the world, including Buddhism and Native American folklore, recount the tale of a rabbit that lives on the moon. This shared myth may reflect common interpretations of markings on the lunar surface—an alternate take on the fabled “man in the moon.” Shortly before Apollo 11 landed on the moon in 1969, mission control in Houston jokingly referred to the Chinese version of the story, telling the spaceship’s crew, “Among the large headlines concerning Apollo this morning, there’s one asking that you watch for a lovely girl with a big rabbit.” Command module pilot Michael Collins replied, “Okay. We’ll keep a close eye out for the bunny girl.”

Ankh – is the Egyptian Symbol of Life

Mandala – Symbolic symbol of universal forces. The Wheel which is Not a Wheel. Very potent with connections to All and Everything.

Flower of life – is hidden/unseen immersed in paint is patterns of creation as they emerged from the “Great Void”. Everything is made from the Creator’s thought.
After the creation of the Seed of Life the same vortex’s motion was continued, creating the next structure known as the Egg of Life. This structure forms the basis for music, as the distances between the spheres is identical to the distances between the tones and the half tones in music. It is also identical to the cellular structure of the third embryonic division (The first cell divides into two cells, then to four cells then to eight). Thus this same structure as it is further developed, creates the human body and all of the energy systems including the ones used to create the Merkaba.

Lotus – The Lotus Symbol was a potent ancient Egyptian symbol and icon in the mythology and legends of Egypt and often depicted in ancient Egyptian art. According to ancient Egyptian mythology the Lotus symbolized the sun, of creation, rebirth and regeneration. Nefertem was the god of healing, medicine and beauty and strongly associated with the lotus and often depicted in Egyptian art with a large lotus blossom forming his crown

Heart – represents the Mana of life force energy.

Thank you, Mahalo, Namaste

Posted by:Melanie
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